Capitol Police warned of possible militia plots targeting Congress today

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11:30 GMT

It seems unlikely to write a sentence, but the reason we got two landmark votes in the House yesterday was because they were rushing through business to make sure it wouldn’t be disrupted if there was. an attack on the Capitol today.

The FBI, the Department of Homeland Security and the United States Capitol Police Department have obtained intelligence indicating a possible conspiracy to “violate the Capitol by identified militia” today, Capitol Police said yesterday. . From a distance, it is difficult to judge the credibility of the threat or whether the authorities are simply acting out of caution after the events of January 6.

The National Guard was paralyzed before the attack – Commanding General of the DC National Guard Gen. Division William Walker said there was an “unusual” memo of Jan. 5 from then Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy restricting its ability to deploy a so-called Rapid Reaction Force without McCarthy’s approval. Without this restriction, Walker said, he “would have sent them there immediately as soon as I hung up” after his call with Then Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund ask for help.

Walker told committees, “I was never really told” why the restrictions were placed on him. But he drew a stark contrast between January 6 and the response to racial justice protests over the summer.

Asked by Homeland Security Committee Chairman, Democrat of Michigan Gary Peters, though he got immediate approval from McCarthy and Miller to deploy guards in June, Walker replied, “Yes. Pressed by Peters to see if he got immediate approval to deploy on January 6, Walker replied, “No”

11:18 am GMT

There was a brief period last night where House Democrats were able to say their police justice bill had at least bipartisan support, but not for long. Republican Lance Gooden from Texas later tweeted to clarify that he pressed the wrong button. “I have arguably the most conservative / America First voting record in Congress! Of course, I would not support the radical left anti-police law.

I have arguably the most conservative / America First voting record in Congress!

Of course, I would not support the radical left anti-police law.

I changed the official record to reflect my opposition! pic.twitter.com/s7uCdlxvgO

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